Connect to Consumers Through Your Website Content

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Website content is every business’s best friend or worst nightmare. Executed correctly, your business will rank high on search engines, encourage visitors to learn more about your business, and capture more business through your leads. If you choose to not fully plan out your content, your website will not be used to its full potential and be ignored by your hard-earned visitors.

Content is King” may be a broken-record statement from top SEO, Google and marketing professionals, but they wouldn’t say it if it wasn’t true. Your content not only needs to be high priority, but it must be written in a way to drive visitors to feel confident about doing business with you. It’s not as tricky as it may seem, but below are some examples to help you connect to your consumers through your website content.

Website Copy vs Content

First, we would like to point out that there is a difference between website copy and website content. Website copy is more engaging and “salesy” text that encourages people to buy whatever you are selling. There is usually a clear call-to-action after the “pitch” so your visitors know what you want them to do. Website copy is seen in Contact Us pages, landing pages or product descriptions. Website content is, in short, everything else and the heart of your website. It’s more informational that isn’t selling anything, but serves as painting a clear picture as to who you are for your visitors.

As you can guess, you’ll include some copy on your website, but it has to be used in the right places. Consumers aren’t stupid; they know when they’re being sold to. Don’t shove copy down your visitors’ throat; allow them to learn how your business could benefit them through website content. It’s not about what you can offer, but what you have.

Consumer-Driven Content vs Not Consumer-Driven Content

There is a paradox that many businesses fall into while creating their website content: when you’re the seller, you think it’s all about you, but when you’re the buyer you think it’s all about you. Since your website’s purpose is to show visitors who you are and what you do, it’s best to keep your messaging consumer-centric.

Let’s look at an example:

You are looking to buy a new pair of headphones. There are two main headphone companies with different verbiage on their website’s homepage. One of them says, “Over 20 years of Creating Better Sound: We’ve mastered the art of sound and exceed our customer’s ears expectations,” and the second website says, “Say Hi to High-Def: Experience a new kind of sound with our new high-definition headphones.” Can you see how the second website’s messaging has more consumer-centric? They’re focusing on the consumer benefit versus highlighting their own business. WIIFM (what’s in it for me) will be a constant question visitors ask themselves when reviewing your website, so keep this in mind when creating your website content.

Other Website Content Tips

Below are some other tips to keep in mind when writing consumer-centric content for your website:

  • Each piece of short content should plant a seed to get their own thoughts/emotions. These “seeds” will lead to them creating their own perception of your company, not one you’re trying to force feed them.
  • Include a second call-to-action when possible. It shouldn’t be “buy now,” but more along the lines of “find out more.”
  • Write about common issues faced by customers. Create an extensive blog post for each of you FAQs or clear the air about a common problem customers face in your industry.
  • Sprinkle testimonials around your whole website. Don’t create one dedicated page for them; the more places you place them, the more likely your visitors will see them.
  • Keyword count is irrelevant now. Don’t keyword stuff your content!

If you feel your website content is missing the mark in connecting to your visitors, take some much needed time to rewrite it in their favor. You’ll receive more traffic, gain more customers and be seen as a business that truly cares about their customer’s needs.

 

*This blog was inspired by Tom Tortorici’s WordCamp Atlanta 2016 presentation, “Smart Writing for Business Websites.” Watch his presentation below!

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Brooke Desmond

Communications Manager
With a passion for all things digital marketing, Brooke aims to give a unique perspective on the latest trends and ideas in this ever-changing space.

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